Category Archives: News

The Zooniverse at the Royal Society

Pano Royal

On the 3rd of July the Zooniverse team headed to London to take part in the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition. Several Zooniverse projects were featured, including Galaxy Zoo, Penguin Watch and The Plastic Tide:

Zooniverse

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Zooniverse at the Royal Society

For those of you new to the Zoo, the Zooniverse is an online platform for Citizen Science research. It relies on volunteers to analyse data which then contributes to real research. This often results in new discoveries, publications and data sets useful to the wider research community. At the Royal Society, Zooniverse team members; Adam McMaster, Grant Miller, Cam Allen, Jim O’Donnell and Helen Spiers gave visitors a whistle stop tour of the Zooniverse and answered any questions people had about what we do. Visitors were surprised at the plethora of projects on the platform that they can contribute to, and got to ‘listen to the Zooniverse’ via a web page that plays a note for every classification made! You can listen to it here, it’s not the easiest thing to dance to but I think it makes nice background music.

Galaxy Zoo

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Galaxy Zoo

Members of the Galaxy Zoo team, Coleman Krawczyk and Jen Gupta, shared the ‘Tactile Universe’ with visitors. The Tactile Universe is a project aimed at making astronomy more accessible to those with visual impairments. The team behind it has developed a way to 3D print galaxy images so that the brighter parts of the picture stick out more. This allows you to feel the shape of the galaxy rather than see it. People really seemed to enjoy trying to match up pictures of the galaxies with what they could feel on the ‘Tactile Universe’ tiles. Also on show was the Galaxy Zoo project, which asks volunteers to identify the type of galaxy in an image.

Penguin Watch

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Penguin Watch

Do you want to count some penguins? If yes then Penguin Watch is the project for you! Fiona Jones, a member of the Penguin Watch team, and myself showed this project off to visitors at the exhibition. Visitors were interested to learn how something as simple as clicking on the penguins in an image can make a big difference to not only scientists but also the penguins themselves. This is because scientists can use the information they get from Penguin Watch to monitor and protect the penguin populations. We also had some cold weather gear and a ration pack which the team need to set up the Penguin Watch cameras in the cold arctic climate. (I still tried the gear on despite the 25 degree temperatures in sunny London!).

The Plastic Tide

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Plastic Tide

Showing visitors the big problem of plastic pollution in our oceans was The Plastic Tide team; Peter Kohler, Stefan Leutenegger, Karl-Mattias Tepp, and Arturo Castillo. The Plastic Tide project asks volunteers to look at photos of beaches taken by their drone and tag plastic and other rubbish. Visitors to the exhibition were very interested to learn that they could help with this project even from the comfort of their own homes! The team also gave a live demonstration of how they are using the data they get from the Zooniverse to train a computer to identify rubbish on beaches!

 

Visit Zooniverse: www.zooniverse.org

Visit Galaxy Zoo: www.galaxy-zoo.org

Visit Penguin Watch: www.penguinwatch.org

Visit Plastic Tide: www.the-plastic-tide.org

A Zooniverse Spin-Out Company

I wanted to let you know that a new company called 1715 Labs has been set up to make commercial use of the software created by the Zooniverse team. Specifically, the company will explore how other businesses might make use of our tools in order to classify and label images, text, audio and video.

We’ve been approached over the years by a number of companies with such projects in mind, but the Zooniverse policy has always been to accept only projects whose aim is academic research. (See our policy statement at https://www.zooniverse.org/help/lab-policies).

This is not changing. This policy will remain the same for Zooniverse projects, so you can be sure that any project you see at Zooniverse.org will continue to have as its goal the advancement of academic research. Projects developed by 1715 Labs will not appear at Zooniverse.org.

It’s also important that you, the volunteers, know that the Zooniverse will not be handing the new company any of your data or personal information. Indeed, according to the Zooniverse privacy policy we will not be able to. Instead, the company will use the same software as the Zooniverse to reach other crowds who can take part in any projects it creates.

The team who have been working on the Zooniverse will continue to do so, just as they always have. However, the possibility exists that some team members – including myself – may serve as paid consultants for 1715 Labs as the new company gets off the ground. This work will be managed separately from work for us in the Zooniverse.

1715 Labs is formally a spin-out company of the University of Oxford, where a large part of the Zooniverse team have been based from the beginning. It is currently led by Sophie Hackford (We’re currently recruiting a long-term CEO – if you’re interested, send me a CV). Normally, the researchers involved in leading such a spin-out would receive equity in the new company, and benefit financially from it.

However, in this case, we have given up any such rights, passing the shares instead to another new organisation, the 1715 Association. This means – unusually for a spin out company – no-one involved in Zooniverse owns shares or has a financial stake in the new company. (As noted above, some of the team may end up working for 1715 labs as consultants).

The 1715 Association is what’s known as a company limited by guarantee. If it receives money as a result of its ownership of shares in 1715 Labs, it must use it in accordance with its objects. The objects of the 1715 Association are to benefit citizen science research, especially through the Zooniverse. Should the company do well, therefore, the result will be additional funding for our work here at Zooniverse.org and the chance to build new, better, more interesting projects.

This is good news – we want the excellent software our developers have created to be used, and if it can benefit our research, then so much the better. Hopefully, businesses with data that needs labelling will be inspired by this link to the Zooniverse to work with 1715 Labs.

I’m looking forward to seeing what happens with this new venture. In the meantime, I’m happy to answer any questions in the comments below or over on Talk.

Chris Lintott, PI for Zooniverse

Experiments on the Zooniverse

Occasionally we run studies in collaboration with external  researchers in order to better understand our community and improve our platform. These can involve methods such as A/B splits, where we show a slightly different version of the site to one group of volunteers and measure how it affects their participation, e.g. does it influence how many classifications they make or their likelihood to return to the project for subsequent sessions?

One example of such a study was the messaging experiment we ran on Galaxy Zoo.  We worked with researchers from Ben Gurion University and Microsoft research to test if the specific content and timing of messages presented in the classification interface could help alleviate the issue of volunteers disengaging from the project. You can read more about that experiment and its results in this Galaxy Zoo blog post https://blog.galaxyzoo.org/2018/07/12/galaxy-zoo-messaging-experiment-results/.

As the Zooniverse has different teams based at different institutions in the UK and the USA, the procedures for ethics approval differ depending on who is leading the study. After recent discussions with staff at the University of Oxford ethics board, to check our procedure was up to date, our Oxford-based team will be changing the way in which we gain approval for, and report the completion of these types of studies. All future study designs which feature Oxford staff taking part in the analysis will be submitted to CUREC, something we’ve been doing for the last few years. From now on, once the data gathering stage of the study has been run we will provide all volunteers involved with a debrief message.

The debrief will explain to our volunteers that they have been involved in a study, along with providing information about the exact set-up of the study and what the research goals were. The most significant change is that, before the data analysis is conducted, we will contact all volunteers involved in the study allow a period of time for them to state that they would like to withdraw their consent to the use of their data. We will then remove all data associated with any volunteer who would not like to be involved before the data is analysed and the findings are presented. The debrief will also contain contact details for the researchers in the event of any concerns and complaints. You can see an example of such a debrief in our original post about the Galaxy Zoo messaging experiment here https://blog.galaxyzoo.org/2015/08/10/messaging-test/.

As always, our primary focus is the research being enabled by our volunteer community on our individual projects. We run experiments like these in order to better understand how to create a more efficient and productive platform that benefits both our volunteers and the researchers we support. All clicks that are made by our volunteers are used in the science outcomes from our projects no matter whether they are part of an A/B split experiment or not. We still strive never to waste any volunteer time or effort.

We thank you for all that you do, and for helping us learn how to build a better Zooniverse.

Who’s in the Zoo – Sophia Vaughan

Hello, my name is Sophia Vaughan, I’m a Physics studeIntro2nt from Oxford University but I don’t spend all of my time studying physics, I also like to knit and go to science fiction conventions (especially Star Trek ones).

I’m posting on this blog because I’ve just started a summer project here at Zooniverse and while I’m here hoping to create a new project for the Zooniverse. But don’t worry you don’t need to be a scientist, student or a professor to create a project, all you need is Zooniverse account! If all goes well you’ll see future blog post(s) from me on how to build your own project for using the project builder.

Who’s who in the Zoo – Michele Darrow

In this week’s edition of Who’s who in the Zoo, meet Science Scribbler‘s Michele Darrow.

– Helen


 

IMG_20180427_171949

 

Project: Science Scribbler

Researcher: Michele Darrow, Development Scientist

Location: TTP Labtech & Diamond Light Source

 

What are your main research interests?

I’m interested in various imaging techniques and how best to process the data collected from them to answer both biological questions and to develop algorithms to automate the process in the future.

 

Who else is in your project team? What are their roles?

Our team spans biologists, imaging technique experts and software engineers.

 

Tell us more about the data used in your project

Right now, Science Scribbler is working to process a dataset related to Huntington’s Disease. Many of the circular objects marked by volunteers as part of the project are organelles. These are smaller compartments inside of each cell, and each type of compartment has a different job. In Huntington’s Disease, some of the compartments are dysfunctional, but details about how the disease leads to this dysfunction aren’t really known. By comparing a diseased cell to a non-diseased cell we’re hoping to learn about organelle changes due to the disease.

 

How do Zooniverse volunteers contribute to your research? 

Zooniverse volunteers are amazing! Without them, this project would be moving at a glacial speed!

For this project, volunteers are asked to place marks in the centers of objects and outline the objects. This information will first tell us where all of the organelles are so we can begin to answer our biological question. And second, using this dataset as a standard, we hope to create a computer algorithm that will use just the center points to find the outlines of the objects, making the task easier and faster in the future.

 

 

What discoveries, and other outputs, has your project led to so far?

We have retired 50% of the images in this first dataset. Because we’re far enough along, Mark, one of the software developers on the project, has begun to process the data. You can see the code that he is working on and his descriptions of what it does here.(https://github.com/DiamondLightSource/zooniverse/blob/master/notebooks/science_scribbler.ipynb)

 

 

What’s in store for your project in the future?

The problem of segmentation – marking out parts of a dataset in order to analyze is – is a common problem across many imaging techniques and disciplines. One of the benefits of working on these problems at Diamond Light Source is that there are always people and projects that need improved segmentation. Our next project on Science Scribbler will focus on a new imaging technique and a new segmentation problem. This switch in focus will give the original project some time to process the data, come up with potential computer algorithms to improve the process and think about the next steps. And it will give a new project and new researchers a chance to interact with the Zooniverse to jumpstart their research!

 

What are your favourite other citizen research projects and why?

I love Wildwatch Kenya! I find it super chill and it’s always fun when you find an animal in the picture!

 

 

And finally, when not at work, where are we most likely to find you?

Long walks with my husband and dogs (Jinx and Charm) and reading good books (right now, re-reading the Harry Potter series).

 

IMG_20180612_110727 - Michele Darrow

Panoptes CLI 1.0.1 and Panoptes Client for Python 1.0.1

We’ve recently released updates for the Panoptes command-line interface and the Panoptes Client module for Python containing a few bug fixes.

From the changelog for Panoptes Client:

  • Fix: Exports are not automatically decompressed on download
  • Fix: Unable to save a Workflow
  • Fix: Fix typo in documentation for Classification
  • Fix: Fix saving objects initialised from object links

And from the CLI:

  • Fix: Modifying projects makes them private

You can install the updates by running pip install -U panoptescli and pip install -U panoptes-client.

What’s going on with the classify interface? Part three

Part three in a multi-part series exploring the visual and UX changes to the Zooniverse classify interface

Coming soon!

Today we’ll be going over a couple of visual changes to familiar elements of the classify interface and new additions we’re excited to premier. These updates haven’t been implemented yet, so nothing is set in stone. Please use this survey to send me feedback about these or any of the other updates to the Zooniverse.

Keyboard shortcut modal

New modals

Many respondents to my 2017 design survey requested that they be able to use the keyboard to make classifications rather than having to click so many buttons. One volunteer actually called the classifier “a carpal-tunnel torturing device”. As a designer, that’s hard to hear – it’s never the goal to actively injure our volunteers.

We actually do support keyboard shortcuts! This survey helped us realize that we need to be better at sharing some of the tools our developers have built. The image above shows a newly designed Keyboard Shortcut information modal. This modal (or “popup”) is a great example of a few of the modals we’re building – you can leave it open and drag it around the interface while you work, so you’ll be able to quickly refer to it whenever you need.

This behavior will be mirrored in a few of the modals that are currently available to you:

  • Add to Favorites
  • Add to Collection / Create a New Collection
  • Subject Metadata
  • “Need Help?”

It will also be applied to a few new ones, including…

Field Guide

New field guide layout

Another major finding from the design survey was that users did not have a clear idea where to go when they needed help with a task (see chart below).

Survey results show a mix of responses

We know research teams often put a lot of effort into their help texts, and we wanted to be sure that work was reaching the largest possible audience. Hence, we moved the Field Guide from a small button on the right-hand side of the screen – a place that can become obscured by the browser’s scrollbar – and created a larger, more prominent button in the updated toolbar:

By placing the Field Guide button in a more prominent position and allowing the modal to stay open during classifications, we hope this tool will be taken advantage of more than it currently is.

The layout was the result of the audit of every live project I conducted in spring 2017:

Field Guide
Mode item count 5 Mode label word count 2
Min item count 2 Min label word count 2
Max items count 45 Max label word count 765

Using the mode gave me the basis on which to design; however, there’s quite a disparity between min and max amounts. Because of this disparity, we’ll be giving project owners with currently active projects a lot of warning before switching to the new layout, and they’ll have the option to continue to use the current Field Guide design if they’d prefer.

Tutorial

Another major resource Zooniverse offers its research teams and volunteers is the Tutorial. Often used to explain project goals, welcome new volunteers to the project, and point out what to look for in an image, the current tutorial is often a challenge because its absolute positioning on top of the subject image.

No more!

In this iteration of the classify interface, the tutorial opens once as a modal, just as it does now, and then lives in a tab in the task area where it’s much more easily accessible. You’ll be able to switch to the Tutorial tab in order to compare the example images and information with the subject image you’re looking at, rather than opening and closing the tutorial box many times.

A brand-new statistics section

Another major comment from the survey was that volunteers wanted more ways to interact with the Zooniverse. Thus, you’ll be able to scroll down to find a brand-new section! Features we’re adding will include:

  • Your previous classifications with Add to Favorites or Add to Collection buttons
  • Interesting stats, like the amount of classifications you’ve done and the amount of classifications your community have done
  • Links to similar projects you might be interested in
  • Links to the project’s blog and social media to help you feel more connected to the research team
  • Links to the project’s Talk boards, for a similar purpose
  • Possibly: A way to indicate that you’re finished for the day, giving you the option to share your experience on social media or find another project you’re interested in.

The statistics we chose were directly related to the responses from the survey:

Survey results

Respondents were able to choose more than one response; when asked to rank them in order of importance, project-wide statistics were chosen hands-down:

Project-wide statistics are the most important

We also heard that volunteers sometimes felt disconnected from research teams and the project’s accomplishments:

“In general there is too less information about the achievement of completed projects. Even simple facts could cause a bit of a success-feeling… how many pictures in this project over all have been classified? How much time did it take? How many hours were invested by all participating citizens? Were there any surprising things for the scientists? Things like that could be reported long before the task of a project is completely fullfilled.”

Research teams often spend hours engaged in dialog with volunteers on Talk, but not everyone who volunteers on Zooniverse is aware or active on Talk. Adding a module on the classify page showing recent Talk posts will bring more awareness to this amazing resource and hopefully encourage more engagement from volunteers.

Templates for different image sizes and dimensions

When the project builder was created, we couldn’t have predicted the variety of disparate topics that would become Zooniverse projects. Originally, the subject viewer was designed for one common image size, roughly 2×3, and other sizes have since been shoehorned in to fit as well as they can.

Now, we’d like to make it easier for subjects with extreme dimensions, multimedia subjects, and multi-image subjects to fit better within the project builder. By specifically designing templates and allowing project owners to choose the one that best fits their subjects, volunteers and project owners alike will have a better experience.

Very wide subjects will see their toolbar moved to the bottom of the image rather than on the right, to give the image as much horizontal space as possible. Tall subjects will be about the same width as they have been, but the task/tutorial box will stay fixed on the screen as the image scrolls, eliminating the need to scroll up and down as often when looking at the bottom of the subject.

Wide and tall subjects

Let’s get started!

I’m so excited for the opportunity to share a preview of these changes with you. Zooniverse is a collaborative project, so if there’s anything you’d like us to address as we implement this update, please use this survey to share your thoughts and suggestions. Since we’re rolling these out in pieces, it will be much easier for us to be able to iterate, test, and make changes.

We estimate that the updates will be mostly in place by early 2019, so there’s plenty of time to make sure we’re creating the best possible experience for everyone.

Thank you so much for your patience and understanding as we move forward. In the future, we’ll be as open and transparent as possible about this process.

Who’s who in the Zoo – Sam Blickhan

In this week’s edition of our Who’s who in the Zoo series meet Dr Sam Blickhan who leads the development of new Humanities projects here in the Zooniverse. 

– Helen


IMG_9388 - Samantha Blickhan

Name: Sam Blickhan

Location: Adler Planetarium, Chicago IL, USA

 

 

Tell us about your role within the team:

I’m the IMLS Postdoctoral Fellow and Humanities Lead. I started in March of 2017 as a Postdoc, and started to take on more Humanities Lead duties in 2018.

 

What did you do in your life before the Zooniverse?

Before coming to the Zooniverse I was a student. I did my undergrad at the University of Iowa, studying Medieval English Literature and classical Voice Performance. Then I did a Masters in Musicology at Oxford, and went on to do a PhD in Musicology at Royal Holloway, University of London, writing about the palaeography of medieval music notation. I’ve always been interested in technologies of writing and the development of language, as well as digital approaches to research and teaching, so being able to work on transcription projects with Zooniverse is a really great way to continue that academic work in a not-so-traditional format.

 

What does your typical working day involve?

Always coffee. Depending on what I’m working on, my day could involve communication with research teams, project planning/design/development with my Zooniverse colleagues, grant writing, data analysis, preparing conference papers & presentations, professional development, and/or researching & writing articles. It varies quite a bit from day to day, which I love — I never, ever get bored, and I get to meet lots of interesting people!

 

How would you describe the Zooniverse in one sentence?

Zooniverse is as much or as little as you want it to be; a way to relax, to learn, and engage with others.

 

Tell us about the first Zooniverse project you were involved with

When I was in grad school I used to volunteer on Seafloor Explorer as a way to relax — I felt like I could turn off the part of my brain that was doing lots of critical thinking, while still doing something productive and interesting. The first project I was actually a part of developing was Anti-Slavery Manuscripts.

 

What’s been your most memorable Zooniverse experience?

I’m lucky to be able to travel regularly for my job, and I love meeting people from other platforms and/or institutions and learning about how their crowdsourcing projects work. I was part of a panel discussion at the IMLS (Institute of Museum and Library Services) in 2017, and got to meet some people who have been doing really amazing work for a long time. It was exhilarating to be able to have conversations about public research methods and access to archival materials and data, and learn from these larger communities of researchers and advocates, as well as show them what tools and opportunities for research we at Zooniverse have to offer.

 

What are your top three citizen science projects? 

SCOTUS Notes (www.scotusnotes.org) is one of my favorite new projects. I’m a bit of a politics junkie, so reading the Justices’ comments can be a very interesting look at the thought processes behind these Supreme Court decisions. I think that the American Soldier project (https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/tkotwim/the-american-soldier) is also incredible. The soldiers’ responses to the questions are often very moving and powerful to read. Outside the Zooniverse, I’m a big fan of the Colored Conventions Project (http://coloredconventions.org/) — I was lucky enough to meet some of their team at a conference last year, and they do an incredible job of engaging their community in a positive way, and reminding the public how important it is to keep re-examining history and working to create space for those who have been overlooked. I’ve learned a lot from listening to them and watching their work.

 

What advice would you give to a researcher considering creating a Zooniverse project?

Look at as many other projects as you can! Really spend some time classifying, but also try to get a sense of what the volunteer and research communities are like across projects. Reach out to other project owners, as well as volunteer and Talk moderators, and ask about their experiences. It’s hard to anticipate what it will be like to run a project if you haven’t yet participated in one. Learn by doing!

 

When not at work, where are we most likely to find you?

Since it’s summer, I’m probably outside running, biking, or on a patio with friends. I love to make things and enjoy knitting & embroidery in particular. Music is a big part of my life, too — I go to lots of concerts and play music with friends whenever I can.


 

You can follow Sam on twitter @snblickhan

What’s going on with the classify interface? Part two

Part two in a multi-part series exploring the visual and UX changes to the Zooniverse classify interface

The breakdown

Today and in the next post, we’ll take a look at the reasoning behind specific changes to the classifier that we’ve already started to roll out over the past few months. We’ve had good discussions on Talk about many of the updates, but I wanted to reiterate those conversations here so there’s just one source of information to refer back to in the future.

In case you missed it, the first blog post in this series previews the complete new classify layout.

As a reminder, if you have feedback about these changes or anything else on the site you’d like to see addressed, please use this survey link.

Navigation bar

Updated navigation bar

We started with a rethinking of each project’s navigation bar. The new design features cleaner typography, a more prominent project title, and visual distinction from the sitewide navigation. It also includes the project’s home page background image, giving the project visual distinction while keeping the classify interface itself clean and legible. It’s also responsive: on smaller screen heights, the height of the navigation bar adjusts accordingly.

The most important goal we solved in making this change was to separate the project navigation from the site navigation. During my initial site research and in talking to colleagues and volunteers, many found it difficult to distinguish between the two navigations. Adding a background, a distinct font style, and moving the options to the right side of the page accomplishes this goal.

Neutral backgrounds

Classify interface with neutral background

In conjunction with adding the background image to the navigation bar, the background image was removed from the main classify interface. It was replaced with a cool light grey, followed quickly by the dark grey of the Dark Theme.

Legibility is one of the main goals of any web designer, and it was the focus of this update. By moving to clean greys, all of the focus is now on the subject and task. There are some really striking subject images on Zooniverse, from images of the surface of Mars to zebras in their natural habitat. We want to make sure these images are front and center rather than getting lost within the background image.

The Dark Theme was a suggestion from a Zooniverse researcher – they pointed out that some subject images are similar in tone to the light grey, so a darker theme was added to make sure contrast would be enough to make the image “pop”. We love suggestions like this! While the team strives to be familiar with every Zooniverse project, the task is sometimes beyond us, so we rely on our researchers and volunteers to point out anomalies like this. If you find something like this, you can use this survey to bring it to my attention.

Another great suggestion from a Zooniverse volunteer was the addition of the project name on the left side of the screen. This hasn’t been implemented yet, but it’s a great way to help with wayfinding if the interface is scrolled to below the navigation bar.

Updated task section

New task section

By enclosing the task and its responses in a box rather than leaving it floating in space, the interface gives a volunteer an obvious place to look for the task across every project. Adjusting the typography elevates the interface and helps it feel more professional.

One of the most frequent comments we heard in the 2017 survey was that the interface had far too much scrolling – either the subject image or the task area was too tall. The subject image height will be addressed at a later date, but this new task area was designed specifically with scrolling in mind.

I used the averages I found in my initial project audit and the average screen height (643 px) based on Google Analytics data from the same time period to design a task area that would comfortably fit on screen without scrolling. It’s important to note that there are always outliers in large-scale sites like Zooniverse. While using averages is the best way to design for most projects, we know we can’t provide the most optimal experience for every use case.

You’ll also notice the secondary “Tutorial” tab to the right of the “Task” label. This is a feature that’s yet to be implemented, and I’ll talk more about it in the next post.

And more to come

The next installments in this series will address the additional updates we have planned, like updated modals and a whole new stats section.

Check back soon!

What’s going on with the classify interface? Part One

Part one in a multi-part series exploring the visual and UX changes to the Zooniverse classify interface

First, an introduction.

Zooniverse began in 2007, with a galaxy-classifying project called Galaxy Zoo. The project was wildly successful, and one of the lead researchers, Chris Lintott, saw an opportunity to help other researchers accomplish similar goals. He assembled a team of developers and set to work building custom projects just like Galaxy Zoo for researchers around the world.

And things were good.

But the team started to wonder: How can we improve the process to empower researchers to build their own Zooniverse projects, rather than relying on the team’s limited resources to build their projects for them?

Thus, the project builder (zooniverse.org/lab) was born.

In the first year of its inception, the number of projects available to citizen scientist volunteers nearly doubled. Popularity spread, the team grew, and things seemed to be going well.

That’s where I come in. * Record scratch *

Three years after the project builder’s debut, I was hired as the Zooniverse designer. With eight years’ experience in a variety of design roles from newspaper page design to user experience for mobile apps to web design, I approached the new project builder-built projects with fresh eyes, taking a hard look at what was working and what areas could be improved.

Over the next week, I’ll be breaking down my findings and observations, and talking through the design changes we’re making, shedding more light on the aims and intentions behind these changes and how they will affect your experience on the Zooniverse platform.

If you take one thing away from this series it’s that this design update, in following with the ethos of Zooniverse, is an iterative, collaborative process. These posts represent where we are now, in June 2018, but the final product, after testing and hearing your input, may be different. We’re learning as we go, and your input is hugely beneficial as we move forward.

Here’s a link to an open survey in case you’d like to share thoughts, experiences, or opinions at any point.

Let’s dive in.

Part one: Research

My first few weeks on the job were spent exploring Zooniverse, learning about the amazing world of citizen science, and examining projects with similar task types from across the internet.

I did a large-scale analysis of the site in general, going through every page in each section and identifying areas with inconsistent visual styles or confusing user experiences.

Current site map, March 2017
Analysis of current template types

After my initial site analysis, I created a list of potential pages or sections that were good candidates for a redesign. The classify interface stood out as the best place to start, so I got to work.

Visual design research

First, I identified areas of the interface that could use visual updates. My main concerns were legibility, accessibility, and varying screen sizes. With an audience reaching to the tens of thousands per week, the demographic diversity makes for an interesting design challenge.

Next, I conducted a comprehensive audit of every project that existed on the Zooniverse in March 2017 (79 in total, including custom projects like Galaxy Zoo), counting question/task word count, the max number of answers, subject image dimensions, field guide content, and a host of other data points. That way, I could accurately design for the medians rather than choosing arbitrarily. When working on this scale, it’s important to use data like these to ensure that the largest possible group is well designed for.

Here are some selected data:

Task type: Drawing 20
Answers
Average number of possible answers 2 Answer average max word count 4.5
Min number 1 Answer max max word count 10
Max number 7 Answer min max word count 2
Median number 1 Answer median max word count 1
Number with thumbnail images 1

 

Task type: Question 9
Answers
Average number of possible answers 6 Answer average max word count 6
Min number 2 Answer max max word count 18
Max number 9 Answer min max word count 1
Median number 3.5 Answer median max word count 4
Number with thumbnail images 3

 

Task type: Survey 9
Answers
Average number of possible answers 31 Answer average max word count 4
Min number 6 Answer max max word count 7
Max number 60 Answer min max word count 3
Median number 29 Answer median max word count 4
Number with thumbnail images 9

Even More Research

Next, I focused on usability. To ensure that I understood issues from as many perspectives as possible, I sent a design survey to our beta testers mailing list, comprising about 100,000 volunteers (if you’re not already on the list, you can opt in via your Zooniverse email settings). Almost 1,200 people responded, and those responses informed the decisions I made and helped prioritize areas of improvement.

Here are the major findings from that survey:

  • No consensus on where to go when you’re not sure how to complete a task.
  • Many different destinations after finishing a task.
  • Too much scrolling and mouse movement.
  • Lack of keyboard shortcuts.
  • Would like the ability to view previous classifications.
  • Translations to more languages.
  • Need for feedback when doing classifications.
  • Finding new projects that might also be interesting.
  • Larger images.

In the next few blog posts, I’ll be breaking down specific features of the update and showing how these survey findings help inform the creation of many of the new features.

Without further ado

Basic classify template

Some of these updates will look familiar, as we’ve already started to implement style and layout adjustments. I’ll go into more detail in subsequent posts, but at a high level, these changes seek to improve your overall experience classifying on the site no matter where you are, what browser you’re using, or what type of project you’re working on.  

Visually, the site is cleaner and more professional, a reflection of Zooniverse’s standing in the citizen science community and of the real scientific research that’s being done. Studies have shown that good, thoughtful design influences a visitor’s perceptions of a website or product, sometimes obviously, sometimes at a subliminal level. By making thoughtful choices in the design of our site, we can seek to positively affect audience perceptions about Zooniverse, giving volunteers and researchers even more of a reason to feel proud of the projects they’re passionate about.

It’s important to note that this image is a reflection of our current thought, in June 2018, but as we continue to test and get feedback on the updates, the final design may change. One benefit to rolling updates out in pieces is the ability to quickly iterate ideas until the best solution is found.

The timeline

We estimate that the updates will be mostly in place by early 2019.

This is due in part to the size of our team. At most, there are about three people working on these updates while also maintaining our commitments to other grant-funded projects and additional internal projects. The simple truth is that we just don’t have the resources to be able to devote anyone full-time to this update.

The timeline is also influenced in a large part by the other half of this update: A complete overhaul of the infrastructure of the classifier. These changes aren’t as visible, but you’ll notice an improvement in speed and functionality that is just as important as the “facelift” portion of the update.

Stay tuned!

We’ve seen your feedback on Talk, via email, and on Github, and we’re happy to keep a dialog going about subsequent updates. To streamline everything and make sure your comments don’t get missed, please only use this survey link to post thoughts moving forward.